New video from Electric Wizard

English doom metal

After a three year break, Electric Wizard returns to the music scene with new songs. Just recently, the band released their new video for the song “See You in Hell”. It’s the first official song from their future album, “Wizard Bloody Wizard”, which is set to be released on the 27th of October, 2017. The video was released under the label Spinefarm Records, a Universal Music company. The official YouTube channel which released it has the termination “VEVO” on his description, confirming the affiliation with the known label. The basis of the video is obvious from the first moments; “See You in Hell” has the same format as the Black Sabbath videos filmed in the 70s from songs like “Paranoid” or “Iron Man”. These similarities include the band’s name which appears in the beginning, the band members being filmed from a little distance and the psychedelic themes being on the background of the clip. Comments already have flooded the video and most of them praise Electric Wizard for their “Black Sabbath tribute”. “See You in Hell” was directed by Marek Steven from Witchfinder Productions, in collaboration with Spinefarm Records.

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